In the Fall of 2012, a group of BYU Graduate Students in English under the supervision of Brandie Siegfried, helped to found The Margaret Cavendish Bibliography Initiative as part of an assignment.  The founding members of MCBI, whose work gathering and checking citations is included here, are Dan Giullian, Lauran Fuller, Sari Carter, Hillary Gamblin, Kelsey Smith, Laura Marostica, Rachel Payne, RoseE Hadden, and Patria Wright.

This is an initial foray, not a finished project.  We encourage scholars in Cavendish studies to submit additional bibliographic items using the submission form located on this page.

We wanted to make this available to scholars immediately, despite further necessary changes (alphabetizing and jump-linking the final list of topics, cross-listing topics with links to related bibliographic websites, clips from digital media of Cavendish in performance, etc.). In short, this is a work in progress.

The updated version is the result of the efforts of  BYU graduate students Jennifer Thorup, Sylvia Cutler, and Elise Moberly.

 

Acevedo-Zapata, Diana. “Margaret Cavendish. Writing, Style and Natural Philosophy.” Kriterion-Revista De Filosofia 58, no. 137 (2017): 271-290.

Adachi, Mami. “Creating the Female Self: Margaret Cavendish’s Authorial Voice and Fictional Selves.” In Hot Questrists After the English Renaissance: Essays on Shakespeare and His Contemporaries, edited by Yasunari Takahashi and Yasuo Tamaizumi, 69-88. New York: AMS Press, 2000.

—. “‘Zuno no gekijo’: Margaret Cavendish ni miru jiko seikei no kokoromi.” Eigo Seinen/Rising Generation 142, no. 5 (1996): 243-47.

Adcock, Fleur. “Killed with Kindness — Slip-Shod Sibyls: Recognition, Rejection and the Woman Poet by Germaine Greer.” New Statesman & Society 8, no. 373 (Oct 06, 1995): 37.

Ahearn, Kathleen A. “‘I’m Not a Feminist but …’: Liberatory Approaches to Teaching Margaret Cavendish’s the ‘Blazing World.’” Women’s Writing 14, no. 2 (2007): 215-31.

Aït-Touati, Frédérique. “Margaret Cavendish: The Battle of Instruments.” In Fictions of the Cosmos: Science and Literature in the Seventeenth Century. Chicago: Chicago University Press, 2011.

—. “Margaret Cavendish vs. Robert Hooke: An Impossible Duel.” Revue De Synthèse 137, no. 3-4 (2016): 247-269.

Akerman, Susanna. “Margaret Cavendish and the Microscope as Play.” In Men, Women, and the Birthing of Modern Science, edited by Judith P. Zinsser. DeKalb: Northern Illinois University Press, 2005.

Akkerman, Nadine and Marguerite Corporaal. “Mad Science beyond Flattery: The Correspondence of Margaret Cavendish and Constantijn Huygens.” Early Modern Literary Studies, Special Issue 14 (2004): 2-21.

—. “‘Some New Rarities’: de Correspondentie van Margaret Cavendish en Constantijn Huygens.” Historica 26, no. 2: 12-4.

Anderson, Misty G. “Tactile Places: Materializing Desire in Margaret Cavendish and Jane Baragwanath, Judith. Barker.” Textual Practice 13, no. 2 (1999): 329-52.

Anderson, Penelope. “Covert Politics and Separatist Women’s Friendship: Margaret Cavendish and Mary Astell.” In Friendship’s Shadows: Women’s Friendship and the Politics of Betrayal in England, 1640-1750, by Penelope Anderson, 222-59. Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press Limited, 2012.

Andrea, Bernadette. “Coming Out in Margaret Cavendish’s Closet Dramas.” In-between 9, no. 1-2 (2000): 219-41.

Ankers, Neil. “Margaret Cavendish and the Nature of the Individual.” In-between 9, no. 1-2 (2000): 301-15.

—. “Paradigms and Politics: Hobbes and Cavendish Contrasted.” In A Princely Brave Woman: Essays on Margaret Cavendish, Duchess of Newcastle, edited by Stephen Clucas, 242-54.  Aldershot: Ashgate, 2003.

Anscomb, Lisa. “‘A Close, Naked, Natural Way of Speaking’: Gendered Metaphor in the Texts of Margaret Cavendish and the Royal Society.” In-between 9, no. 1-2 (2000): 161-77.

Aoyama, Seiko. “1999. Onnatachi no yūtopia: M. kyavendisshu ryozentaru shinsekai.” Eigo Seinen/Rising Generation 144, no. 11: 646-8.

Apostalova, Iva. “Princess Elizabeth of Bohemia and Margaret Cavendish: The Feminine Touch in Seventeenth-Century Epistemology.” Maritain Studies/Etudes Maritainiennes 26, (2010): 83-97.

“Aristocratic Pastimes.” In Daily Life Through World History in Primary Documents, edited by Lawrence Morris, 247-248. Vol. 2, The Middle Ages and Renaissance. Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 2009.

Arvas, Abdulhamit. “Ecoerotic Imaginations in Early Modernity and Cavendish’s the Convent of Pleasure.” In New International Voices in Ecocriticism, edited by Oppermann, Serpil, Scott Slovic and Greta Gaard, 147-157. Maryland: Lexington Books, 2015.

Ashmore, Elias. The history of the most noble Order of the Garter: Wherein is set forth an account of the town, castle, chappel, and college of Windsor; … To which is prefix’d, a discourse of knighthood in general, … Collected by Elias Ashmole, … The whole illustrated with proper sculptures. London: printed for A. Bell, W. Taylor, and J Baker, and A. Collins, 1715. CAP XXV.

Atherton, Margaret. “Cavendish, Margaret (1623?-1673).” In Encyclopedia of Philosophy, 2nd ed., edited by Donald M. Borchert, 117-118. Vol. 2. Detroit: Macmillan Reference USA, 2006.

—. ed., Women philosophers of the Early Modern Period. Indianapolis: Hackett Publishing Company, 1994.

Backscheider, Paula R. An Annotated Bibliography of Twentieth-Century Critical Studies of Women and Literature, 1660-1800. New York: Garland Publishing, 1977.

Baird-Badinger, Amber. “The State of Letters: Meaty Close Readings,” In-between: Essays and Studies in Literary Criticism 10, no. 2 (September 2001): 209-22.

Baker-Putt, Alyce R. “Redefining the Female Self through Female Communities: Margaret Cavendish’s The Female Academy, The Convent of Pleasure, and Bell in Campo.”  SRASP 29 (2006): 37-46.

Ballard, George. “Memoirs of Margaret Duchess of Newcastle.” In Memoirs of several ladies of Great Britain, who have been celebrated for their writing or skill in the learned languages, arts and sciences, 299-306. Oxford: W. Jackson, 1752.

Ballaster, Ros. “Restoring the Renaissance: Margaret Cavendish and Katherine Philips.” In Renaissance Configurations: Voices/Bodies/Spaces, 1580-1690, edited by Gordon McMullan, 234-52. Basingstoke: Macmillan Press Limited, 1998.

Barnes, Diana. Epistolary Community in Print, 1580-1664. Aldershot: Ashgate, 2013.

—. “Familiar Epistolary Philosophy: Margaret Cavendish’s Philosophical Letters (1664).” Parergon: Journal of the Australian and New Zealand Association for Medieval and Early Modern Studies 26, no. 2 (2009): 39-64.

—.“The Public Life of a Woman of Wit and Quality: Lady Mary Wortley Montagu and the Vogue for Smallpox Inoculation.” Feminist Studies 38, no. 2 (Summer, 2012): 330-362, 530.

—. “The Restoration of Royalist Form in Margaret Cavendish’s Sociable Letters.” Women Writing, 1550-1750, edited by Wallwork, Jo and Paul Salzman, 201-214: Meridian, 2001.

Bartow, Virginia. “Philosophical Studies of the Duchess of Newcastle.” Journal of Chemical Education 34, no. 2 (1957): 82-87.

Battigelli, Anna. “Between the Glass and the Hand: The Eye in Margaret Cavendish’s Blazing World.” 1650-1850: Ideas, Aesthetics, and Inquiries in The Early Modern Era, no. 2 (1996): 25-38.

—. Margaret Cavendish and the Exiles of the Mind. Lexington: University Press of Kentucky, 1998.

—. “Political Thought/Political Action: Margaret Cavendish’s Hobbesian Dilemma.” In Women Writers and the Early Modern British Political Tradition, edited by Hilda Smith, 40-55. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1998.

Baumgold, Deborah. “Book Reviews.” Perspectives on Politics 12, no. 1 (2014): 200-201.

Beal, Peter.  In Praise of Scribes: Manuscripts and their Makers in Seventeenth-Century England. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1998.

Begley, Justin. “Confessional Disputes in the Republic of Letters: Susan Du Verger and Margaret Cavendish.” The Seventeenth Century https://doi.org/10.1080/0268117X.2017.1406819.

—. “The Damnation of Margaret Cavendish: Versions of a Satirical Epitaph.” Notes & Queries 63, no. 4 (2016): 567-569.

—. “‘The minde is matter moved’: Nehemiah Grew on Margaret Cavendish.” Intellectual History Review 27, no. 4 (2017): 493-514.

Bell, Susan Groag. “Women Create Gardens in Male Landscapes: A Revisionist Approach to Eighteenth-Century English Garden History.” Feminist Studies 16, no. 3 (Fall, 1990): 471.

Beneden, Ben van, and Nora de Poorter. Royalist Refugees: William and Margaret Cavendish in the Rubens House, 1648-1660. Antwerp: Rubenshuis & Rubenianum, 2006.

Bennett, Alexandra. ed. Bell in Campo & The Sociable Companions, by Margaret Cavendish. Orchard Park: Broadview Press Ltd., 2002.

—. ed. The Early Modern Englishwoman, 1500-1750: The Collected Works of Jane Cavendish. New York: Routledge, 2018.

—. “Fantastic Realism: Margaret Cavendish and the Possibilities of Drama.” In Authorial Conquests: Essays on Genre in the Writings of Margaret Cavendish, edited by Line Cottegnies and Nancy Weitz, 179-94. London: Associated Presses, 2003.

—. “Happy Families and Learned Ladies: Margaret Cavendish, William Cavendish, and Their Onstage Academy Debate.” Early Modern Literary Studies Special Issue 14 (2004): 1-14.

—. “Introduction.” In Bell in Campo & The Sociable Companions, by Margaret Cavendish, edited by Alexandra G. Bennett, 7-17. Orchard Park: Broadview Press Ltd., 2002.

—. “Margaret Cavendish and the Theatre of War.” In Ashgate Critical Essays on Women Writers in England, 1550-1700: Vol. 7, edited by Sara H. Mendelson, 103-13. Farnham: Ashgate, 2009.

—. “Testifying in the Court of Public Opinion: Margaret Cavendish Reworks The Winter’s Tale.” In Cavendish and Shakespeare, Interconnections, edited and introduced by Katherine Romack and James Fitzmaurice, 85-102. Burlington: Ashgate, 2006.

—. “‘Yes, and’: Margaret Cavendish, the Passions and Hermaphrodite Agency.”  In Early Modern Englishwomen Testing Ideas, edited by Jo Wallwork and Paul Salzman, 75-87. Burlington: Ashgate, 2011.

Bertrand, Ingrid. “Filling In What Was Left Out: Voices and Silences of Biblical Women.” In Voices and Silence in the Contemporary Novel in English, edited by Vanessa Guignery, 112-29. Newcastle upon Tyne: Cambridge Scholars Publishing, 2009.

Bertolet, Anna Riehl. Queens Matter in Early Modern Studies (Queenship and Power). Palgrave Macmillan, 2018.

Bertuol, Roberto. “The Square Circle of Margaret Cavendish: The 17th-century Conceptualization of Mind by Means of Mathematics.” Language and Literature 10, no. 1 (2001): 21-39.

Bethune, George W. The British Female Poets with Biographical and Critical Notes. Philadelphia: Lindsay and Blakiston, 1848.

Billing, Valerie. “‘Treble marriage’: Margaret Cavendish, William Newcastle, and Collaborative Authorship.” Journal for Early Modern Cultural Studies 11, no. 2 (2011): 94-122.

Biographia Britannica: Or, The Lives Of The Most eminent Persons Who have flourished in Great Britain and Ireland, From the earliest Ages, down to the present Times: Collected from the best Authorities, both Printed and Manuscript, And digested in the Manner of Mr. Bayle’s Historical and Critical Dictionary: Volume the First. London: 1747.

Birch, Thomas. History of the Royal Society of London. 4 vols. London: 1756-7.

Black, Andrew. “‘Perswade us out of our selves’: Margaret Cavendish’s Regulation of Rhetoric.” The Seventeenth Century 33.3 (2018): 303-322. https://doi.org/10.1080/0268117X.2017.1339247.

Blake, Liza. “The Grounds of Literature and Science: Margaret Cavendish’s Creature Manifesto.” Palgrave Handbook of Early Modern Literature and Science. Ed. Howard Marchitello and Lyn Tribble. New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2017. 3-26

Blaydes, Sophia B. “The Duchess’ Dilemma.” The Bulletin of the West Virginia Association of College English Teachers 4, no. 1 (1977): 44-52.

—. “Nature Is a Woman: The Duchess of Newcastle and Seventeenth-Century Philosophy.” In Man, God, and Nature in the Enlightenment, edited by Donald C. Mell, Theodore E. D. Braun, and Lucia M. Palmer, 51-64. East Lansing: Michigan State University Press, 1988.

—. “The Poetry of the Duchess of Newcastle: A Pyramid of Praise.” The Bulletin of the West Virginia Association of College English Teachers 6, no.1-2 (1981): 26-34.

Boehrer, Bruce Thomas. Animal Characters: Nonhuman Beings in Early Modern Literature. Pennsylvania: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2010.

Boesky, Amy. Founding Fictions: Utopias in Early Modern England. Athens: University of Georgia Press, 1996.

Bonin, Erin Lang. “Margaret Cavendish’s Dramatic Utopias and the Politics of Gender.” Studies in English Literature, 1500-1900 40, no. 2 (2000): 339-54.

—. “Margaret Cavendish, Duchess of Newcastle (1623-15 December 1673).” In Dictionary of Literary Biography, Volume 252: British Philosophers, 1500-1799, edited by Philip B. Dematteis and Peter S. Fosl, 107-15. Farmington Hills: The Gale Group, 2002.

Borchardt, John K. “Mad Madge: Britain’s First Woman Scientist.” Chemistry and Industry. Farmington Hills: The Gale Group, 1994.

Bordinat, Philip. “The Duchess of Newcastle as a Literary Critic.” The Bulletin of the West Virginia Association of College English Teachers 5, no. 1-2 (1979): 6-12.

—. “Newcastle’s Unpublished Poem ‘The Battle’: A Key to the Heart and Mind.” The Bulletin of the West Virginia Association of College English Teachers 9 (1986): 14-9.

Borlik, Todd Andrew.  “The Whale under the Microscope: Technology and Objectivity in Two Renaissance Utopias.” In Philosophies of Technology: Francis Bacon and His Contemporaries, edited by Claus Zittel, Gisela Engel, Nanni Romano, and Nicole C. Karafyllis, 231-49. Leiden: Brill Academic Publishers, 2008.

Botonaki, Effie. “Marching on the Catwalk and Marketing the Self: Margaret Cavendish’s Autobiography.” A/B: Auto/Biography Studies 13, no. 2 (1998): 159-81.

Boulard, Claire.  “Politique et imagination Féminine dans Natures Pictures (1656) de Margaret Cavendish.” Etudes Epistémè 9 (2006): 429-49.

Bourne, Henry.  The history of Newcastle upon Tyne: or, the ancient and present state of that town. Newcastle upon Tyne: printed and sold by John White, 1736.

Bowerbank, Sylvia. “History of Women in Science: Early Modern to Late Eighteenth Century.” The Women’s Studies Encyclopedia. New York: Routledge.

—. “Margaret Cavendish, 1623-1673.” Literature criticism from 1400 to 1800 30 (1996): 199-205.

—. Speaking for Nature: Women and Ecologies in Early Modern England. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 2004.

—. “The Spider’s Delight: Margaret Cavendish and the ‘Female’ Imagination.” English Literary Renaissance 14, no. 3 (1984): 392-408.

Bowerbank, Sylvia, and Sara Mendelson, eds. Paper Bodies: A Margaret Cavendish Reader. Orchard Park: Broadview Press Ltd., 2000.

Bowles, Emily. “Faults of a female pen? Reading the Traces of Embodiment, Authority, and Misogyny in Margaret Cavendish’s Handwritten Words.” Eighteenth-Century Women 6 (2011): 1-19.

—. “Perfect Patterns of Conjugal Love and Duty: George Ballard’s Domestic Ideologies in His Lives of Elizabeth Egerton and Margaret Cavendish.” Age of Johnson 19 (2009): 167-85.

Boyle, Deborah. “Fame, Virtue, and Government: Margaret Cavendish on Ethics and Politics.” Journal of the History of Ideas 67, no. 2 (2006): 251-89.

—. “Freedom and Necessity in the Work of Margaret Cavendish.” Essay 9, Part II in Women and Liberty, 1600-1800: Philosophical Essays edited by Jacqueline Broad and Karen Detlefsen. Oxford: Oxford UP, 2018.

—. “Margaret Cavendish’s Nonfeminist Natural Philosophy.” Configurations 12, no. 2 (2004): 195-227.

—. “Margaret Cavendish on Gender, Nature, and Freedom.” Hypatia 28, no. 3 (2013): 516-32.

—. “The Natural Philosophy of Margaret Cavendish: Reason and Fancy During the Scientific Revolution.” Review of The Natural Philosophy of Margaret Cavendish: Reason and Fancy During the Scientific Revolution by Lisa T. Sarasohn. ISIS: Journal of the History of Science in Society 102, no. 2 (2011): 360-361.

—. “‘Under a Heap of Dust they Buried Lye, within a Vault of some Small Library’: Margaret Cavendish and the Gendered Space of the Seventeenth-Century Library.” In Libraries, Literatures, and Archives, edited by Mays, Sas, 40-55: Routledge, 2014.

—. The Well-Ordered Universe: The Philosophy of Margaret Cavendish. Oxford: Oxford UP, 2018.

Boyle, Jennifer Ellen. Anamorphosis in Early Modern Literature: Mediation and Affect. Burlington: Ashgate, 2010.

—. Review of The Literary Invention of Margaret Cavendish, by Laura Dodds, Clio 45, no. 1

(2016): 87-93.

—. “Treading the Digital Turn: Mediated Form and Historical Meaning.” Journal for Early Modern Cultural Studies 13, no. 4 (2013): 79-90.

Bradburn, Elizabeth. “1620-1700: Mind on the Move.” In The Emergence of Mind: Representations of Consciousness in Narrative Discourse in English, edited and introduced by Herman, David Lincoln, 132-58. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2011.

Brataas, Delilah Bermudez. “Shakespeare’s Presence and Cavendish’s Absence in the League of Extraordinary Gentlemen.” Shakespeare 11, no. 1 (2015): 39-57.

Brewer, Lisa K. “Encroaching upon the Male Prerogative: Margaret Cavendish and the Construction of a Female Author.” Kentucky Philological Review 15 (2001): 15-21.

Broad, Jacqueline. “Cavendish Redefined.” British Journal for the History of Philosophy 12, no. 4 (2004): 731-41.

—. “Is Margaret Cavendish Worthy of Study Today?” Review of The Natural Philosophy of Margaret Cavendish: Reason and Fancy During the Scientific Revolution by Lisa Sarasohn. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science 42, no. 3 (2011): 457-61.

—. “Margaret Cavendish and Joseph Glanvill: Science, Religion, and Witchcraft.” Studies in History & Philosophy of Science Part A 38, no. 3 (2007): 493-505.

—. “Margaret Cavendish, van Helmont, and the Mad Raging Womb.” In The New Science and Women’s Literary Discourse: Prefiguring Frankenstein, edited by Judy A. Hayden, 47-64. New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2011.

—. Women Philosophers of the Seventeenth Century, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2002.

Broad, Jacqueline, and Karen Green. A History of Women’s Political Thought in Europe, 1400-1700. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2009.

—. eds. Virtue, Liberty, and Toleration: Political Ideas of European Women, 1400-1800. Dordrecht: Springer, 2007.

Brooks, M. M. “Performing Curiosity: Re-viewing Women’s Domestic Embroidery in Seventeenth-Century England.” Seventeenth Century 32, no. 1 (2017): 1-29.

Brown, Sylvia. “Margaret Cavendish: Strategies Rhetorical and Philosophical Against the Charge of Wantonness, Or Her Excuses for Writing So Much.” Critical Matrix 6, no. 1 (1991): 20-45.

Broxap, Ernest. “The Sieges of Hull during the Great Civil War.” The English Historical Review 20, no. 79 (1905): 457-73.

Bruckner, Lynne Dickson. “N/nature and the Difference ‘She’ Makes.” In Ecofeminist Approaches to Early Modernity, edited by Munroe, Jennifer, Rebecca Laroche, Mary O’Connor, Sara Mendelson and Rebecca Bushnell, 15-35. Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 2011.

Brunton, T. Lauder. “The Cavendish Lecture on Elimination & Its Uses In Preventing And Curing Disease.” The British Medical Journal 1, no. 1590 (1891): 1321-6.

Buck, Charles. Anecdotes, Religious, Moral, and Entertaining Alphabetically Arranged, and interspersed With A Variety of Useful Observations.: Selected By Charles Buck, 6th ed. Volume 1. London: James Compton, 1815.

Bullard, Rebecca. “Gatherings in Exile: Interpreting the Bibliographical Structure of Natures Pictures Drawn by Fancies Pencil to the Life (1656).” English Studies 92, no. 7 (2011): 786-805.

—. “The Natural Philosophy of Margaret Cavendish: Reason and Fancy During the Scientific Revolution.” Review of The Natural Philosophy of Margaret Cavendish: Reason and Fancy During the Scientific Revolution by Lisa T. Sarasohn. Review of English Studies 63, no. 258 (2012): 161-163.

Burgess, Irene. “Recent Studies in Margaret Cavendish, Duchess of Newcastle (1623-1674); William Cavendish, Duke of Newcastle (1593-1676); and Jane Cavendish Cheyne (1622-1669).” English Literary Renaissance 32 (2002): 452-73.

Burnett, Linda Avril. “Re-Reading John Ford’s ‘Tis Pity She’s a Whore; Re-Writing Tragedy: Margaret Cavendish’s The Unnatural Tragedy.” Renaissance and Reformation 34, no. 4 (2011): 85-111.

Burroughs, Catherine. “‘Hymen’s Monkey Love’: The Concealed Fancies and Female Sexual Initiation.” Theatre Journal 51, no. 1 (1999): 21-31.

Campbell, Mary Blaine. “Margaret Cavendish: Gender, Science and Politics.” Early Modern Women: An Interdisciplinary Journal 10, no. 2 (2016): 232-236.

—. Wonder and Science: Imagining Worlds in Early Modern Europe. Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 1999.

Capoferro, Riccardo. “Imaginary Voyages’ Aesthetic Theories: Towards a Definition of the Fantastic.” In Britain and Italy in the Long Eighteenth Century: Literary and Art Theories, edited by Loretelli, Rosamaria and Frank O’Gorman, 156-164: Cambridge Scholars, 2010.

Caspard, Pierre. Review of “Relation véridique de ma naissance, de mon éducation et de ma vie, préface de Line Cottegnies.” Clio: Histoire, Femmes, et Sociétés, 41 (2015): 2.

Cavendish, Margaret. Bell in Campo and Sociable Companions. Edited by Alexandra Bennett. Peterborough: Broadview Press, 2002.

—. The Blazing World and Other Writings. Edited by Kate Lilley. London: Penguin, 1992.

—. The Blazing World Annotated: Special Edition. Edited by Pradip Das, Biswajit Das PVT, 2018.

—. CCXI Sociable Letters Written by the Thrice Noble, Illustrious, and Excellent Princess, the Lady Marchioness of Newcastle. London: William Wilson, 1664

—. A Collection of Letters and Poems microform / Written by Several Persons of Honour and Learning, Upon Divers Important Subjects, to the Late Duke and Dutchess of Newcastle.  London: Langly Curtis, 1678.

—. The Convent of Pleasure and Other Plays. Edited by Anne Shaver. Baltimore, Johns Hopkins UP, 1999.

—. The Convent of Pleasure. Edited by Sharon L. Jansen, Saltar’s Point Press, 2016.

—. The Description of a New World, Called the Blazing World written by the Thrice Noble, Illustrious, and Excelllent Princesse, the Duchess of Newcastle. London: A. Maxwell, 1666.

—. The Description of a New World, Called the Blazing World written by the Thrice Noble, Illustrious, and Excelllent Princesse, the Duchess of Newcastle. London: A. Maxwell, 1668.

—. The Description of a New World, Called the Blazing World. Edited by Sara Mendelson. Broadview Press, 2016.

—. De Vita et Rebus Gestis Nobilissimi Illustrissimique principis, Guilielmi ducis Novo-Castrensis, Commentarii ab Excellentissima Principe, Margareta, ipsius uxore sanctissima conscript; et ex Anglico in Latinum conversi. London: Excudebat T.M. , 1668.

—. The Female Academy, edited by Sharon L. Jansen. Saltar’s Point Press, 2017.

—. Ground of Natural Philosophy Divided into Thirteen Parts: With an Appendix Containing Five Parts / Written by the…Duchess of Newcastle. London: A. Maxwell, 1668.

—. The Life of the Thrice Noble, High, and Puissant Prince William Cavendishe, Duke, Marquess, and Earl of Newcastle Written by Margaret, Duchess of Newcastle, his wife. London: A. Maxwell, 1667.

—. The Life of the Thrice Noble, High, and Puissant Prince William Cavendishe, Duke, Marquess, and Earl of Newcastle Written by Margaret, Duchess of Newcastle, his wife. London: A. Maxwell, 1675.

—. The Life of William Cavendish, Duke of Newcastle: To Which is Added the True Relation of My Birth, Breeding and Life, edited by C.H. Firth. London, 1906.

—. Margaret Cavendish: Political Writings: Cambridge Texts in the History of Political Thought. Edited by Susan James. Cambridge UP, 2003.

—. Natures Pictures drawn by Fancies Pencil to the Life Written by the Thrice noble, illustrious, and excellent Princess, the Lady Marchioness of Newcastle. London: J. Martin and J. Allestrye, 1656.

—. Natures Picture drawn by Fancies Pencil to the Life being Several Feigned Stories, Comical, Tragical, Tragi-comical, Poetical, Romanicical, Philosophical, Historical, and Moral : Some in Verse, Some in Prose, Some Mixt, and some by Dialogues / Written by … the Duchess of Newcastle. London: A. Maxwell, 1671.

—. Observations upon Experimental Philosophy to which is added, The description of a new Blazing World / written by … Princesse, the Duchess of Newcastle. London: A. Maxwell, 1668.

—. Observations upon Experimental Philosophy to which is added The description of a new blazing world / written by the thrice noble, illustrious, and excellent princesse, the Duchess of Newcastle. London: A. Maxwell, 1666.

—. Observations upon Experimental Philosophy. Edited by Eileen O’Neill. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2001.

—. Observations Upon Experimental Philosophy: Abridged, with Related Texts. Edited by Eugene Marshall. Indiana: Hackett Publishing Company, 2016.

—. Orations of Divers sorts, Accommodated to divers places. Written by the thrice noble, illustrious, and excellent princess, the Dutchess of Newcastle. London: A. Maxwell, 1668.

—. Orations of divers sorts, accommodated to divers places Written by the thrice noble, illustrious, and excellent princess, the lady Marchioness of Newcastle. London: A. Maxwell, 1663.

—. Orations of divers sorts, accommodated to divers places written by the Lady Marchioness of Newcastle. London, 1662.

—. The Philosophical and Physical Opinions written by Her Excellency the Lady Marchioness of Newcastle. London: J. Martin and J. Allestrye, 1655.

—. Philosophical and Physical Opinions written by … the Lady Marchioness of Newcastle. London: William Wilson, 1663.

—. The Philosophical and Physical Opinions. Forgotten Books, 2017.

—. Philosophicall Fancies. Written by the Right Honourable, the Lady Newcastle. London: Tho. Roycroft for J. Martin and J. Allestrye, 1653.

—. Philosophical Letters, or, Modest Reflections upon some Opinions in Natural Philosophy Maintained by Several Famous and Learned Authors of this Age, expressed by way of letters / by the thrice noble, illustrious, and excellent princess the Lady Marchioness of Newcastle. London, 1664.

—. Philosophical Letters: Reflections Upon Some Opinions in Natural. Proquest EEBO Editions, 2010.

—. Playes written by the thrice noble, illustrious and excellent princess, the Lady Marchioness of Newcastle. London: A. Warren for James Martyn, James Allestry, and Tho. Dicas, 1662.

—. Plays, never before printed written by the … Princesse the Duchess of Newcastle. London: A. Maxwell, 1668.

—. Poems and Fancies Written by the Right Honourable, Lady Margaret Newcastle. London: T. R. for J. Martin and J. Allestrye, 1653. (1653).

—. Poems and Fancies with The Animal Parliament. Edited by Brandie Siegfried. Toronto: Iter Press, 2018.

—. Poems and Phancies written by … The Lady Marchioness of Newcastle. London: William Wilson, 1664.

—. Poems, or, Several fancies in verse with the Animal parliament in prose / Written by the thrice noble, illustrious, and excellent princess, the Duchess of Newcastle. London: A. Maxwell, 1668.

—. The Worlds Olio Written By The Right Honorable, The Lady Margaret Newcastle. London: J. Martin and J. Allestrye, 1655.

—. The Worlds Olio Written by the Thrice noble, illustrious, and most excellent princess, the Duchess of Newcastle. London: A. Maxwell, 1671.

Cavendish, Margaret and Alex Covalciuc. “A True Relation of My Birth, Breeding, and Life.” The Literature of Autobiographical Narrative, edited by Thomas Riggs, vol. 1: Autobiography and Memoir, St. James Press, 2013: 229-232.

Cavendish, William. An English Prince: Newcastle’s Machiavellian Political Guide to Charles II. Edited by Gloria Italiano Anzilotti. Pisa: Giardini Editori E Stampatori, 1988.

—. Letters and Poems in Honour of the Incomparable Princess Margaret, Duchess of Newcastle. London: 1676.

Cerasano, S. P. and Marion Wynne-Davies, eds. Readings in Renaissance Women’s Drama: Criticism, History, and Performance 1594-1998. London: Routledge, 1998.

—. Renaissance Drama by Women: Texts and Documents. London: Routledge, 1996.

Chalmers, Hero. “Dismantling the Myth of ‘Mad Madge’: The Cultural Context of Margaret Cavendish’s Authorial Self-Presentation.” Women’s Writing 4, no. 3 (1997): 323-39.

—. “‘Flattering Division’: Margaret Cavendish’s Poetics of Variety.” In Authorial Conquests: Essays on Genre in the Writings of Margaret Cavendish, edited by Line Cottegnies and Nancy Weitz, 123-44. London: Fairleigh Dickinson University Press, 2003.

—. “The Politics of Feminine Retreat in Margaret Cavendish’s The Female Academy and The Convent of Pleasure.” Women’s Writing 6, no. 1 (1999): 81-94.

—. Royalist Women Writers, 1650-1689. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 2004.

Chalmers, Hero et al., eds. Three seventeenth-century plays on women and performance. Manchester: Manchester University Press, 2011.

Chao, Tien-yi. “‘Between Nature and Art’: The Alchemical Underpinnings of Margaret Cavendish’s Observations upon Experimental Philosophy and The Blazing World.” EurAmerica 42, no.1 (2012): 45-82.

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